Samantha O'Callaghan - Johnson Matthey

Samantha O'Callaghan - Johnson Matthey

UK

Title

Binder Jet Ceramic Additive Manufacturing in Johnson Matthey.

Abstract

Johnson Matthey have built up a wealth of experience in the production of ceramic substrates via Additive Manufacturing.  This technology has been developed from a concept and idea (Technology Readiness Level, TRL 0), to the current commissioning of a pilot plant scale production facility (TRL 4/5).  This was carried out by selecting binder jet as the most scalable ceramic AM process.  The presentation details the development journey of Binder Jet Ceramic AM as targeting being a step changing technology for catalytic and adsorbent applications.  The technology aims to unlock degrees of freedom, allowing complex designs of substrates to be created, which optimise GSA and / or pressure drop for industrial or automotive reactive systems.

Biography

Samantha O’Callaghan is the Research Group Leader for Johnson Matthey – Noble Metal’s Ceramic ALM team. After receiving a Masters of Engineering in Materials Science and Metallurgy from University of Leeds, she then studied for Ph.D in piezoelectric ceramics from Cambridge University, this focused on produced lead-free piezoelectric ceramics using a novel sol-gel synthesis method. Deciding to move into industry, Sam has worked for Mflex, a printed electronics company as a development chemist and then for Xaar, for a printhead manufacturing company as a printhead performance engineer. In her current role as Research Group Leader, Sam has brought her experience in ceramics and printheads to lead a team developing ALM binder ink jet printing in ceramics.   With catalyst and absorbent applications central in Johnson Matthey’s portfolio of products, the focus of her team’s current research is on the use of the novel technology to produce substrates for use as supports catalyst supports at commercial scales.  The use of ALM in this industry, targets the optimisation of pressure drop and geometric surface area of substrates in various fluid systems.